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Younger generation is more tolerant to the ideals that our elders resented

In a recent research, younger generation is found to be more tolerant to many ideals that our elders were opposed to.  For instance, Americans have become more willing to support civil liberties for homosexuals, people who oppose churches and religion, and even those who advocate doing away with elections and letting the military run the country.

“Two things in particular account for this trend: an increase in education and changing attitudes across generations,” said Smith, the author of this report.

College attendance in particular, which has increased in the last 40 years, has prompted people to become more open-minded, he said. In addition, younger generations do not feel the same threat from some of the controversial groups as did their parents.

Smith is author of the NORC report released on Aug. 25, 2011 by NORC at the University of Chicago. The report shows:

  • Support for allowing a “person who is against all churches and religions” to speak rose from 66 percent in 1972 to 76 percent in 2010; approval for teaching rose from 42 percent in 1972 to 60 percent in 2010; and tolerance of having such a book in the library grew from 61 percent in 1972 to 74 percent in 2010.
  • Support for allowing “a person who advocates doing away with elections and letting the military run the country” to speak grew from 55 percent in 1976 to 69 percent in 2010; approval for teaching went from 37 percent in 1976 to 57 percent in 2010; and tolerance of having such a book in the library climbed from 57 percent in 1976 to 71 percent in 2010.
  • Support for allowing an “admitted homosexual” to speak increased from 62 percent in 1972 to 86 percent in 2010; approval for teaching rose from 48 percent in 1973 to 84 percent in 2010; and tolerance of having such a book in the library from 54 percent in 1973 to 78 percent in 2010.

The General Social Survey, conducted for the past 40 years, monitors societal change and the growing complexity of American society. This changing trends in our outlook towards evolving cultures and behavior effects our over all psychological framework and therefore how we interpret the world.

From these studies, it appears that younger generation, in general, seem to be more tolerant to changing life styles and more accepting of the cultural exchange. This means more inter-racial mixing and the resulting offspring.

The cross-cultural intermix will eventually lead to complicated but interesting disease prevention strategies for healthcare providers and social workers. Most of our medical and health related textbooks are currently based on research done on one major race or ethnicity, like Caucasian, African-American, Asian, Hispanic etc. Future medical research will face a newer challenge from intermixing of various races and have to adopt newer research methodologies to cater to these ever evolving cross-cultural human being.

For full Press Release on this study click here

Published by

Rajeev Kurapati MD

Rajeev Kurapati MD

Rajeev Kurapati M.D. is a Family Physician practicing in Northern Kentucky hospitals, USA. Dr. Kurapati developed MDHealthGuide.com to establish an online community dedicated to the accessible sharing of reliable health, and wellness information.